Things at the Doorstep

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We saw this evening of two one-acts based on the works of H.P. Lovecraft last Monday. My review of it for nytheatre.com is here:  http://www.nytheatre.com/showpage.aspx?s=thin11860.

H.P. Lovecraft's tombstone: The inscription reads: "I Am Providence."

What sticks with me, a week later, is what a risk playwright Nat Cassidy took in his play, the second of the evening. He dared to alienate members of the audience (a couple walked out — which I always find so amazing when you’re in an intimate space; can’t you just stick it out? It’s not like we’re talking the six-hour Gatz here, ya know?); it was fearless, if not 100 percent perfectly realized (as I note in my review, some editing would really help; less is more).

And it has inspired me to go read some Lovecraft, which I haven’t done in years. And it made me aware of this interesting site: http://www.dagonbytes.com/thelibrary/lovecraft/; I would be interested in knowing, however, if it’s okay for it to reproduce all of Lovecraft’s stories as it has — presumably they are out of copyright protection?

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3 thoughts on “Things at the Doorstep

  1. Yes, for two three years now Lovecraft’s work has been in the public domain in the USA (and everywhere else), some pieces even since before that, a few others – collaborations perhaps – may still be protected. And there may be some edited works which are themselves protected for the editors. But basically, he’s out there for everybody.

    Your review sounds really interesting. Fearless, eh?

    • Nita Congress

      that explains the nifty site! and i understand there are other quite elaborate websites with full h.p. lovecraft text.

      and yes, the play was most interesting and surprising — i do not want to spoil the playwright’s clever workings by posting here, but i could tell you via email what went on.

  2. Lovecraft and the web are certainly an excellent match. The amount of podcasts and games and props is incredible. There’s a file somewhere (I could look it up, it’s on my hard drive) with all of Lovecraft’s regular stories – so you can do a search & count on whether he uses “blasphemous” more often than “cyclopean” or not.

    Yes, please do send a mail, if it’s not too much trouble. i won’t see the play anyway and i’m somewhat curious.

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